Wonder Woman, Batman and Superman movie tie-in Schleich figurines

These figurines tie in with the characters appearance in the DC Extended Universe (DCEU) movies, such as Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice. They are from the Anglo-German company Schleich who also make animals, dinosaurs, and Smurfs, among others – as well as DC Superheroes.

These are small figures, about 4 inches or 10 cm high, roughly the height of a Star Wars figure – but these are figurines, so they have no articulation.

Batman Superman Wonder Woman Schleich figurines Batman V Superman Dawn of Justice toys
Wonder Woman, Batman, and Superman Schleich figurines compared to their onscreen counterparts they’re based on in Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice

The body sculpts are good, with lots of fine details on the outfits especially. The paint jobs are ok – a few liberties have been taken with the colours, and some details look a little rough in places. These are cheaper than their equivalent action figures though, so perhaps that’s to be expected.

Unlike the other DC Superhero figurines Schleich make, these movie tie-in ones also attempt bear the likeness of the actors playing the characters. Some are more successful than others.

Superman Wonder Woman Batman Schleich figurines

Batman looks close enough to Ben Affleck’s caped crusader, which is also reminiscent the iconic 1980’s The Dark Knight Returns look. Superman looks a lot like Henry Cavill, which is a strike against it in my books (I’m not a fan of his interpretation of Superman). It also has an unfortunate paint job which makes him look rather perplexed – as well as having a pretty pasty complexion (compared to Wonder Woman especially). The Superman figure also appears to be leaning back a lot, seemingly weighed down by his flowing cape.

It could be argued that the Wonder Woman figure is the least successful likeness-wise. However, I really like the way this figure looks – it has a less skinny and stronger looking frame than Gal Gadot (especially compared to the packaging artwork), and her face has more classically Mediterranean in look, in keeping with Wonder Woman’s greek origins.

Gal Gadot Wonder Woman toy compare
This Wonder Woman tie-in toy looks very little like Gal Gadot – especially compared to the packaging artwork.

The Wonder Woman figurine seems to be based very specifically on the first promo image of Gal Gadot as the character.

Gal Gadot Wonder Woman Schleich Figurine
The Wonder Woman figure’s pose closely resembles that of the first promo image of Gal Gadot as the character, released in 2014.

Perhaps because it’s based on this early image, where the outfit’s colours were unclear, some license has been taken with the figurine’s colours. It is a shame that the vibrant blue and red colours of the Superman figure are not repeated in the Wonder Woman paint job, where those colours become pale blue and pink!

Batman V Superman – Dawn of Wonder Woman merchandise

I love the amount of Wonder Woman products we are finally seeing in the shops. For so many years, she has been an obvious omission from the shelves among all the Batman and Superman toys.

I am yet to be convinced about Wonder Woman’s movie outfit, but I am still to see it fully in action. I miss the vibrant primary colours of her classic costume, here looking more like a less earthy Xena Warrior Princess. But seeing Wonder Woman portrayed as a strong, proud, and athletic character is great.

girl playing with Wonder Woman and Batman v Superman Schleich figurines
These figurines, while lacking articulation, provide ample opportunity for character based imaginative role play.

My daughter likes the figures. I was worried the lack of articulation would mean her interest would wane quickly, but she is enjoying lots of imaginative role play with them. Coupled with her other sets of this trio (such as this one and this one), it is firmly established in her head that Wonder Woman is as important a part of this team as Batman and Superman.

Perhaps even more so – as far as she’s concerned Wonder Woman is stronger, cleverer, and has greater leadership skills than either Batman or Superman. Who am I to argue with that?


Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice ©2016 WARNER BROS. ENT. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Disclaimer: We were provided with these figurines free of charge for the purposes of this review.

Family Fever

LEGO Duplo Batman Adventure, featuring Wonder Woman and Superman

One of the best things about Wonder Woman featuring in Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice – as well as finally the character finally making it to the big screen and having her own movie on the way – is the influx of Wonder Woman merchandise on the shelves.

The latest example arrived on our doorstep the other day. Superhero Duplo is relatively new to the brand, the LEGO line designed specifically for young children – typically 1½ to 5 years.

For some reason this set is called Batman Adventure, despite the fact that as well as the aforementioned Wonder Woman, and the caped crusader, it also features Superman – the third part of the Justice League trinity brought together in Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice.

What instantly drew me to this set was the inclusion of Wonder Woman, and she is probably the best served character of the set. While Batman has a basic Batboat, and Superman no vehicle at all, Wonder Woman comes with a pretty cool bike. The dudes have individual cloth capes though.

The scenario of the set is a wonderfully whimsical one – a cat’s in distress on the Gotham City river, and our trio of heroes have to save it from its makeshift raft around a working bascule bridge.

While my daughter at age 4 is getting towards the tail end of Duplo’s suggested age, she loves the study large sized bricks. Having access to these characters in Duplo form is another great way for her to indulge in imaginative play with these heroes. While I have always encouraged her to engage with Wonder Woman, my daughter is also a big fan of Batman and Superman too.

The character design is in keeping with the existing Duplo style, and thankfully at odds with the seriousness displayed in Batman V Superman. In this set, the trinity of heroes that form the Justice League really look like Super Friends.

Lego Duplo Justice League trio compared to Movie Justice League, Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman
Why so serious? The happy Duplo Super Friends are at odds with the deathly earnest look of the movie Justice League trio.

The beauty of Duplo set is that my daughter can follow the simple printed instructions herself without my help, an important aspect of development. There is of course the free play and imaginative aspects that follow.

This is a fun set, and perfect for young superhero fans or any little kids you want to introduce these iconic characters to.

Lego Duplo Wonder Woman on bike


Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice ©2016 WARNER BROS. ENT. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Disclosure: We were provided with this set for the purposes of this review

Family Fever

Itty Bitty Justice League – Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman Plush Toys

While the latest comic book to screen adaptation Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice looks dark and gritty, we much prefer these DC superheroes Itty Bitty. The new movie hits screens this month, and Hallmark – knowing how much we love our superheroes – sent us their own Itty Bitty Justice League: plush toys of Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman – who makes her big screen debut in the movie.

My daughter’s Itty Bitty Star Wars toys (especially Yoda) are already a firm favourites, as they are based on characters she loves. These heroes are no different, as she is very into the adventures of all three of these DC icons. The Itty Bitty versions – especially Wonder Woman – have been a big hit with her.

The cuteness and childlike features of the Hallmark Itty Bitty range of plush toys are well represented in these figures, and offer a nice counterpoint to the po-faced seriousness offered up by the new movie. The characters’ costume designs are so iconic that they are all easily recognisable in their Itty Bitty incarnations (I tested this on the 4-year-old!). The bright and bold looks remind us that these characters look far better when rendered in lively primary colours (although Batman does look a little happier than his characterisation usually allows).

As with the other plush toys in the range, they are all well made, nicely weighted, and perfectly sized for little hands to grasp onto.

While onscreen, DC are creating their own dull and muted Justice League, begin forming your own primary coloured one now, with these great Itty Bitty plush toy versions.

Superman Plush Toy, Batman Plush Toy, Wonder Wonder Plush Toy, Justice League Plush Toys


Check out the full range of Hallmark Itty Bitty plush toys here. We were sent these items free of charge for the purposes of this review.

All characters trademark and copyright DC Comics.

Family Fever

If Kids Can’t See Batman V Superman, Superhero Movies Have Lost the Plot

Is Batman V Superman suitable for kids? Don’t be silly.

This is a golden time for the comicbook nerd. As a superhero loving child, I never dreamed that my beloved comicbook heroes would be dominating both the box office and the cultural conversation in the way that they currently are.

As I was growing up, it used to drive me nuts that people could only see superheroes in terms of the sixties Adam West TV show. Superheroes were primarily silly as far as the general population was concerned. I knew better.

That slowly began to change in the 1980s, with the likes of Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns and Batman: Year One, and Alan Moore’s Watchmen and breakthrough Batman: The Killing Joke. Finally, the idea was getting into people’s heads that superheroes weren’t just for kids.

Except now, things have gone too far. Way too far.

These great superhero movies that are filling up screens on an almost weekly basis? They’re all rated 12/PG-13 as standard. So despite having toys, clothes, and other merchandise marketed to them with these characters – the films that are driving this superhero resurgence are being deliberately produced to be unsuitable for young children.

In terms of movies, I’ve barely had the chance to share my love of Marvel superheroes with my 4-year-old daughter as yet. They are all pitched to an early teen audience. We have watched a couple. The plots are fine, even when they include death they are useful ways of discussing mortality. But the tone of violence is just too visceral to really be considered suitable.

It gets even worse. Warner Bros. have released an R-Rated version of Batman V Superman, so is not recommended for anyone under 17.

This is absolutely insane. Perverse even. The idea of having a mainstream movie with Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman that children are not supposed to see is mind-blowingly ridiculous.

Should Batman V Superman be ok for children?

These characters are first and foremost for kids. Yes, the revisionist takes by Miller and Moore I mentioned were useful pop culture reference texts. But instead of informing our fundamental understanding of these characters and genres, they have become go-to texts in themselves.

I (mostly) love what Chis Nolan did with Batman. But he took it as far as it should go, and even then he gave the character a real heart at the centre of his darkness. Conversely, I almost totally hate what Zach Snyder has done with Superman. Disaster-porn was a correctly used phrase to describe Man of Steel. It was a travesty of what Superman represents.

Currently, Deadpool is rightly rated R, and Jessica Jones on Netflix is also correctly pitched as adults only too. That network’s Daredevil I’m on the fence about, but doing justice (again) to Frank Miller’s interpretation is the right way to go.

But looking ahead we have DC adult movie Suicide Squad, and even the promise from Hugh Jackman of an R-Rated Wolverine.

So in all of this, where are the superhero movies for kids? In the past it seems.

DC had some great animated series, beginning with the Batman Animated Series in the nineties. Superman (1978) and Superman II (1980) are amazing (I would like someone to lock Zach Snyder in a darkened room to watch them repeatedly one day).

And that silly Batman TV show that used to bug me so much? I love it. It’s awesome. It is visually inventive, has great actors terrific playing characters, and is great family viewing – working brilliantly for children and adults. It has one of the best title sequences in TV history. And it gave us Batgirl!

Saying something is ‘for kids’ has been seen (including by me in the past) as saying something is dumb, simplistic, stupid. A bit rubbish.

Well, that’s rubbish. It doesn’t mean that. Making a superhero movie work as a great story with compelling characters, without resorting to ‘gritty’ violence, is a real challenge that takes great skill, effort, and ability.

It is interesting that the best superhero movie ever made is still Superman: The Movie (1978), an epic movie that spans galaxies, has a cast of legends, and gave the source material – comic books for children – the reverence it deserves.

Perhaps things weren’t so bad for onscreen superheroes in my childhood after all.


‘Batman v Superman’ images courtesy of Warner Bros. The Ultimate Edition has been rated 12 in the UK.

Review: DC Comics Secret Hero Society – Study Hall of Justice

Existing somewhere between a comic and a book, DC Comics Secret Hero Society – Study Hall of Justice, is a fun way to explore the characters of Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman in an all new setting.

Set in an alternative timeline, this sees a young Bruce Wayne attending the exclusive school Ducard Academy, where he befriends a certain Kansas farm boy and a foreign young woman of royal descent (Superman and Wonder Woman in case you were wondering).

But all is not right in the school, and if you’re a follower of the DC universe in either it’s comic, film, or TV forms, the names of the teachers – and the academy itself – should be a hint at what’s really going on there.

It’s written by Derek Fridolfs and illustrated by Dustin Nguyen, who were the team behind a similarly cute Li’l Gotham. While ostensibly a comic book, this also has tracts of text and graphics as part of the story – such as text messages, letters, articles, diary entires, and more. It’s a book equivalent of a multi-media story telling approach that works really well, and encourages more reading than your usual comic book.

The characterisations are spot on, and close in spirit with their comic equivalents while being a wry commentary on them. While this centres on the young dark knight detective, it’s also nice to see the bond forming (and sometimes cracking) between him and Superman & Wonder Woman.

I liked a sequence when Diane Prince (Wonder Woman) tried to go undercover and get on the cheerleading team, followed by an unsuccessful athletics try-out. There is also a nice nod to her mission in fighting war – by trying to stop Superman and Batman fighting. Plenty of other female characters from the DC universe show up too such as girls called Harley, Pamela, and Talia 😉

This is a fun little book, that’s may be of particular interest to a young reader looking for something a little more relatable to them, while still staying true to the classic characters.


DC Comics Secret Hero Society – Study Hall of Justice

by Derek Fridolfs and Dustin Nguyen, is published by Scholastic and is available now.